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New Podcast! Scannain Podcast (2018) #23!

We’re now completely caught up on the Scannain podcast. And with new and improved sound design, thanks to the wonderful Donnacha Coffey.

This week, I join a fantastic panel including Grace Duffy, Jason Coyle, Ronan Doyle, and Donnacha Coffey from Filmgrabber. As ever a wide-ranging discussion took place, including talk about Set It Up and Netflix’s niche, the incredibly vibrant world of Streets of Fire, the continuing disaster that is Star Wars fandom after the release of Solo: A Star Wars Story and whether Lady Bird is the best film of the year so far. New releases include The Happy Prince, Kissing Candice and Ocean’s 8.

Give it a listen at the link, or check it out below.

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Non-Review Review: The Happy Prince

“I am my own Judas,” explains Oscar Wilde around the midway point of The Happy Prince.

Just in case the audience doesn’t get the point, The Happy Prince is saturated with religious iconography and constant reminders of how Oscar Wilde was his own worst enemy. At one early point, Wilde confronts a group of homophobes in a church. At another, Wilde reflects on the local church that he visits for solace and how it reminds him what it is to suffer. Towards the end of the film, a priest is summoned to deliver the last rites, the splashing of holy water juxtaposed with the spit and venom of a mob in flashback.

Wilde at heart.

The Happy Prince is not an especially subtle or nuanced film, which is somewhat ironic for a biography about the life and times of one of the greatest witticists in history. Wilde was one of the most eloquent writers in the English language, as much in his personal correspondence as in any of the plays or stories that he wrote. As such, there is something strange in the bluntness of The Happy Prince, perhaps most transparently in the way that the film bends over backwards to construct a portrait of the writer’s final days that conforms to the eponymous story.

The Happy Prince is a story about a fascinating subject with a compelling central performance, but constructed in such a clumsy manner that the performance of Everett the actor cannot anchor the film of Everett the director.

It could use some fine tuning…

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