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New Escapist Column! “Doctor Who”, “Mission to the Unknown” and Resurrecting the Lost Past…

I published a new Don’t Miss It! piece at Escapist Magazine over the weekend. This one looking at one of the genuine marvels of the modern internet.

Students at the University of Central Lancaster lovingly recreated a lost episode of Doctor Who. Mission to the Unknown was purged from the BBC archives, and thought forever lost along with a host of other classic adventures, so it is amazing to see it brought to life. It is a fascinating episode in a number of respects, from its position as a prelude to the epic Daleks’ Master Plan through to the fact that it’s the rare Doctor Who story without any involvement of the Doctor whatsoever. More than that, though, the recreation is a stunning piece of work from all involved.

You can read the piece here, or click the picture below.

Doctor Who: Frontier in Space (Review)

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the longest-running science-fiction show in the world, I’ll be taking weekly looks at some of my own personal favourite stories and arcs, from the old and new series, with a view to encapsulating the sublime, the clever and the fiendishly odd of the BBC’s Doctor Who.

Frontier in Space originally aired in 1973.

To celebrate the tenth anniversary of the show, the four-part serial The Three Doctors was produced. However, it was also decided that Jon Pertwee’s fourth season in the role should also contain something quite a bit grander than the average Doctor Who serial. Clearly intended to rival the epic (and lost) Daleks’ Master Plan in terms of scale and scope, an epic twelve-part adventure was conceived that would run across two back-to-back serials. It would open with Frontier in Space, before easing gently into Terry Nation’s Planet of the Daleks.

Unfortunately the adventure was never quite able to measure up to the series’ earlier Dalek epic, primarily due to problems with the second serial. Still, though somewhat weakened by the necessity to dovetail into the story directly following, Frontier in Space remains a rather wonderful example of the series on its largest scale, offering epic space opera with large-scale consequences.

Lost in space…

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